Counting Religion in Britain, December 2021

Counting Religion in Britain, No. 75, December 2021 features 17 new sources of British religious statistics. The contents list appears below and a PDF version of the full text can be downloaded from the following link: No 75 December 2021

OPINION POLLS

  • Depicting the ethnicity of Jesus Christ: what is acceptable?
  • Ipsos MORI Veracity Index, 2021: trust in clergy and priests to tell the truth slightly up
  • Trust in the Church/organized religion and other institutions, as measured by YouGov
  • Non-stun slaughter of animals for religious reasons: the debate continues
  • Extra-terrestrials, Ipsos MORI, and the public

FAITH ORGANIZATION STUDIES

  • Coronavirus chronicles: Evangelical Alliance’s latest survey on Changing Church
  • Coronavirus chronicles: Church of England Statistics for Mission, 2020
  • Coronavirus chronicles: Christmas special events in churches, 2020 and 2021
  • Jewish children in Jewish schools: Institute for Jewish Policy Research’s latest report
  • Estimating the level of anti-Semitism on Twitter in the UK
  • Jewish perceptions of Labour Party membership: still more to do?
  • Recent reports from the National Association of Teachers of Religious Education

OFFICIAL AND QUASI-OFFICIAL STATISTICS

  • Population estimates by religion, England and Wales, 2019
  • Coronavirus chronicles: vaccination rates among the over-50s by religion

ACADEMIC STUDIES

  • Counting religion in Britain, 1970–2020: new analysis and compendium of data tables
  • Other academic outputs: two collections of essays and three journal articles

PEOPLE NEWS

  • Gordon Heald (1941–2021)

Please note: Counting Religion in Britain is © Clive D. Field, 2021

Posted in church attendance, Covid-19, Historical studies, Ministry studies, News from religious organisations, Official data, People news, Religion and Education, Religion and Ethnicity, Religion and Politics, Religion in public debate, Religion in the Press, Religious beliefs, religious festivals, Religious prejudice, Rites of Passage, Survey news | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Counting Religion in Britain, November 2021

 

Counting Religion in Britain, No. 74, November 2021 features 19 new sources of British religious statistics. The contents list appears below and a PDF version of the full text can be downloaded from the following link: No 74 November 2021

OPINION POLLS

  • Latest updates to YouGov tracker polls on religious issues
  • Popularity of national and religious events: YouGov Ratings data for quarter 3, 2021
  • YouGov@Cambridge Globalism Project, 2021: conspiracy theories
  • Knowledge and awareness of the Holocaust: multinational survey including the UK
  • Savanta ComRes polling for the Centre for Enterprise, Markets, and Ethics
  • Other Savanta ComRes polling: hospitality, marriage, Christmas, religious prejudice

FAITH ORGANIZATION STUDIES

  • Perceiving the Church of England: an insider’s reading of outsider views
  • Church of England’s energy footprint: annual report for 2020
  • Evangelical Alliance survey of Christians and climate change
  • Coronavirus chronicles: children’s ministry and the pandemic
  • Mapping England’s spiritual needs: estimates by Peter Brierley
  • Coronavirus chronicles: Co-operative Funeralcare’s 2021 music charts
  • Coronavirus chronicles: update on Jewish mortality
  • Representations of Muslims and Islam in the British media

OFFICIAL AND QUASI-OFFICIAL STATISTICS

  • Crimes in churches, 2020/21: Freedom of Information data

ACADEMIC STUDIES

  • Round-up of recent publications: four articles, a thesis, and a report

NEW DATASETS

  • UK Data Service, SN 8867: Community Life Survey, 2020-2021
  • UK Data Service, SN 8870: National Survey for Wales, 2020–2021

PEOPLE NEWS

  • Professor Linda Woodhead MBE, now at King’s College London

Please note: Counting Religion in Britain is © Clive D. Field, 2021

 

 

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Counting Religion in Britain, October 2021

Counting Religion in Britain, No. 73, October 2021 features 13 new sources of British religious statistics. The contents list appears below and a PDF version of the full text can be downloaded from the following link: No 73 October 2021

OPINION POLLS

  • UnHerd’s response to Savanta ComRes poll on frequency of churchgoing and prayer
  • YouGov Death Study: some afterlife beliefs
  • Trustworthiness of clergy or priests: Ipsos MORI global study of professional rankings
  • Anti-Semitism in Europe: Ipsos SA survey for the Action and Protection League
  • Coronavirus chronicles: a comeback for Halloween?

FAITH ORGANIZATION STUDIES

  • Coronavirus chronicles: Church of England Statistics for Mission, 2020
  • Results of elections to the Church of England General Synod, 2021
  • Economic and social value of church buildings in the UK
  • UK Jews and climate change: Institute for Jewish Policy Research panel survey
  • Muslim Census survey about Muslim university student finance

OFFICIAL AND QUASI-OFFICIAL STATISTICS

  • Religious hate crimes recorded by police forces in England and Wales, 2020/21
  • Offender management statistics as at 30 September 2021

ACADEMIC STUDIES

  • Six recent articles in academic journals

Please note: Counting Religion in Britain is © Clive D. Field, 2021

Posted in church attendance, Covid-19, Historical studies, Measuring religion, Ministry studies, News from religious organisations, Official data, Religion and Education, Religion and Social Capital, Religious beliefs, Religious prejudice, Survey news | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Review of British Gods by Steve Bruce

The following book review by BRIN’s co-director may be of interest to BRIN readers. This author’s original version is reproduced in accordance with the author self-archiving provision of Brill’s publishing licence. The review was subsequently published in Ecclesiology, Vol. 17, No. 1, 2021, pp.  142–5, https://doi.org/10.1163/17455316-17010006

Steve Bruce, (2020) British Gods: Religion in Modern Britain. Oxford: Oxford University Press. xv + 282 pages, ISBN 978–0–19–885411–1 (hbk), £25.00.

Steve Bruce is an internationally renowned sociologist who has become a household name in theological circles through his prodigious output of books and journal articles on the sociology of religion. In one of his latest titles, Researching Religion (Oxford University Press, 2018), he persuasively contended for the value, indeed the necessity, of social scientific methods and approaches for the effective study and understanding of religion. Across all his outputs, he has written authoritatively from both contemporary and historical perspectives, and with a dual grounding in theory and empirical sources (qualitative and quantitative). Over the years, he has especially built a reputation for inheriting, from the late Bryan Wilson (whose 1966 classic Religion in Secular Society Bruce edited in 2016), the mantle for promulgating the secularization thesis, which, from roots among the founding fathers of sociology, envisages religious decline in the West as the inevitable but unintended consequence of ‘modernization’ (as defined on p. 2 of the work under review). The thesis gained widespread scholarly acceptance during the long 1970s, but it has subsequently been much contested, even by some of those who do not otherwise deny the waning social influence of religion. Such was the academic turning of the tide that, in 2011, Bruce felt compelled to publish Secularization: In Defence of an Unfashionable Theory (Oxford University Press) as a vigorous restatement and elaboration of the paradigm.

In its own way, Bruce’s latest book, British Gods, which he describes as an ‘end-of-career summation study’ (p. vi), is an equally strong and insightful reaffirmation of the secularization thesis, but with less overt emphasis on theory and greater synthesis of the evidence. Emulating the model adopted in his Scottish Gods (Edinburgh University Press), which won the Saltire Society Scottish History Book of the Year Award for 2014, Bruce investigates the process of religious change in Britain, mostly since the Second World War, through ‘two overlapping structures: a series of places and a series of themes’ (p. viii). The cross-cutting themes that frame ten of the eleven chapters are, in order of their appearance: the demise of local religious paternalism; religiosity, community cohesion, and external isolation; the social roles and status of the clergy; Christian ecumenism and divisions; the charismatic movement and New Churches; migrant Christians; Muslims and Islamophobia; folk religion and superstition; Spiritualism and spirituality; and religion and politics. Cumulatively, these themes illuminate a vast expanse of the British religious landscape–Christian, non-Christian, and alternative–but, even with the sub-themes that open up within them, inevitably they cannot possibly paint the entire picture within a single volume. This is not a textbook.

These thematic chapters are underpinned by a variety of sources. Several draw upon Bruce’s restudies of religion in places originally examined by anthropologists and sociologists between the 1940s and 1970s. With initial funding from the Leverhulme Trust, these reinvestigations were conducted by Bruce in 2007–14 through a combination of ethnographic fieldwork and archival research. The communities featured (in chapters 2, 3, 5, and 7) in British Gods comprise: three Scottish islands, four Welsh parishes, Gosforth in Cumbria, Northlew in Devon, Banbury in Oxfordshire, and Bolton in Greater Manchester (the last written up here for the first time). The handshake between each of the case studies and the parental chapter theme is not always clean, and there are points at which the structure creaks a bit; as Bruce acknowledges, ‘some of the locale-theme links are a little clunky’ (p. viii). Relevant local, as well as national, trends are further illustrated by mining the large collection of printed and online news clippings that Bruce has assembled over forty years, and by his own participant observation: ‘For an unbeliever I actually spend an inordinate amount of my time attending church services and other religious events’ (p. x). Finally, there is some use of statistics, both in the restudies (which report changes in the number of places of worship, members, and attenders) and through national figures (notably the results of sample surveys). However, the recourse to quantitative data is not obtrusive and perhaps not as extensive as some may think warranted.

Each of the thematic chapters helpfully has its own conclusion, explaining how it contributes to the volume’s central argument, which is, to paraphrase Bruce’s more nuanced prose, religion in Britain has declined–in popularity, prestige, power, and plausibility–during the course of the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Although he considers that this has especially been the fate of Christianity (whose net fortunes could not be revived by the charismatic movement, Pentecostalism, or immigration and which has allegedly refocused on ‘therapeutic improvement in the lives of believers’, p. 252), other expressions of religion are said not to have filled the vacuum left by the death and disaffiliation of Christians and, indeed, have often experienced a version of secularization themselves. The claims made by critics in refutation of secularization (sometimes even for resacralization), that religion has not decayed but merely been reshaped, are therefore rejected by Bruce, emphatically so when it comes to the discussion of contemporary spirituality (New Age). Over and above the causal undercurrents of modernization, religious socialization is identified as ‘a proximate lever’ of secularization (‘the failure of religious parents to pass on their faith to their children in sufficient numbers to replace the saints as they die’, p. 248), with the attendant decrease in the national stock of religious knowledge (pp. 76–81, 253–4). The book’s eleventh and final chapter addresses the question of whether the decline in religion can be reversed, firmly answering it in the negative, because religious capital has contracted so much, ambient religion has been lost, the state has become religiously neutral, the public reputation of religion has fallen, religious conversions are rare, religion has become alien, and the odds of meeting a true believer are negligible. At the same time, ‘None of this means that religion will die out any time soon’ (p. 270).

This general line of argument is largely not new. Many readers will be familiar with it from Bruce’s previous books, which remain essential to consult for the detail, for example, Politics and Religion in the United Kingdom (Routledge, 2012) in the case of chapter 10. Such readers will probably already have formed an opinion about buying into the secularization thesis, as articulated by Bruce, or not. Of itself, the representation, updating, and elaboration of the case in British Gods, enormously beneficial though it will be to students, will probably not alter the minds of many academics or practitioners. For this reviewer’s part, forensic examination of the metrics of religious change does confirm that secularization (in the descriptive sense of the word) remains valid as the dominant narrative and direction of travel in Britain during modern times, thereby aligning with Bruce (albeit not necessarily with his thesis, and occasionally baulking at one or other of his overstatements). Nevertheless, there are perhaps two areas that require some supplementation, and to which Bruce might wish to turn his attention in any subsequent research.

One field for further reflection is the existence of a wide range of alternative beliefs and worldviews in contemporary Britain, distinct from the conventional beliefs recognized by Christianity and non-Christian religions. These are considered by Bruce to the degree that he includes chapters in British Gods on folk religion and superstition (which are dealt with somewhat dismissively, portrayed as adjuncts to traditional forms of religion and destined to sink alongside them) and on Spiritualism and spirituality, but the beliefs and worldviews extend beyond these subjects. Two questions arise. Where should such beliefs be positioned on the religiosity/secularity spectrum, and how pervasive are they? In defining the cut-off for what constitutes ‘religion’, Bruce makes passing references to a ‘supernatural’ element as a necessary attribute, although the term does not appear in the index. As for the acceptance of such beliefs, there is no robust evidence since the millennium, apart from the module that Bruce was instrumental in getting included in the 2001 Scottish Social Attitudes Survey; for the rest, we are largely dependent upon rather inadequate commercial polling. The other area that needs highlighting is the burgeoning sub-discipline of non-religion, pioneered by scholars such as Lois Lee, but effectively absent from British Gods. Yet, the exponential rise of the nones has been the single most defining facet of the religious scene since the millennium; depending upon question formulation, they now constitute rather more than half the population, albeit they are far from being monolithically irreligious. An allied paradox is why the various secularist, humanist, and ethical agencies dedicated to the advancement of non-belief appear to have failed to record any significant growth in their paid-up membership as a consequence of secularization. The demand for their wares seems as limited as that for religion.

These considerations aside, British Gods is written with Bruce’s characteristic verve, lucidity, logic, and wit, and in an accessible style, minimizing the use of sociological and other technical jargon, which will prove attractive to the general reader beyond the secularization cognoscenti. While the chapter endnotes are adequate, for the most part, the lack of a bibliography or guide to further reading is perhaps regrettable in a volume that has a summative (and thus potentially introductory) purpose. A few typographical errors remain after copy-editing, some occurring more than once, and alphabetization of the index has gone awry in a few places. Otherwise, production standards are what one would expect from the publisher, and the cover price is highly competitive for a hardback edition. The book seems guaranteed to reach a large and diverse market and deservedly so.

Clive D. Field, University of Birmingham

© Clive D. Field, 2021

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Review of Fertility and Faith by Philip Jenkins

The following book review by BRIN’s co-director may be of interest to BRIN readers. This ‘author’s original version’ is being reproduced, on behalf of David Voas, in accordance with the ‘author’s self-archiving policy’ for Oxford University Press journals. The review was subsequently published in Journal of Church and State, Vol. 63, No. 3, Summer 2021, pp. 519–21, https://doi.org/10.1093/jcs/csab021

Fertility and Faith: The Demographic Revolution and the Transformation of World Religions. By Philip Jenkins. Waco, TX: Baylor University Press, 2020. 270 pp. $29.95 hardcover.

Philip Jenkins is a distinguished historian of religion and a prolific commentator on religion and current affairs. Fertility and Faith is a work of remarkable scholarship, amounting to a global overview of both the demographic transition and the decline in religious involvement. Work on this topic is often intemperate, marked by claims that one group is going to swamp another, or that the world is going the dogs because too many people are (take your pick) too Muslim, too Christian, too secular, too slavish or too selfish. By contrast Jenkins is a model of good sense and balanced judgement.

Those qualities make the central thesis of this book all the more astonishing. Jenkins points out that low fertility and secularity go together like, well, not love and marriage these days, but perhaps nuts and bolts. But population growth has been falling almost everywhere outside sub-Saharan Africa. By implication, organized religion is in trouble around the world. If you had told me 10 or 15 years ago that Baylor University Press would publish a book arguing that “the religious character of many non-European areas is highly likely to move in the direction of sweeping secularization” (dust jacket), with blurbs provided by close colleagues of Rodney Stark, the secularization denier-in-chief, I’d have laughed out loud. How times change. The theory that demand for religion is permanent, universal and constant, so that decline can only result from supply-side problems in the religious market, has lived fast and died young.

Jenkins does state that disclaiming a religious identity is compatible with maintaining supernatural beliefs. The book’s last paragraph offers a sop to religious readers: “religions of all kinds are forced to reconsider what their core purpose actually is … That exercise in rethinking could be prolonged and even painful, but the potential opportunities are rich indeed” (p. 199). But we have plenty of evidence that when people stop belonging to religious organizations, the ultimate result is that they, or their children, or their children’s children, drift away from theism and indeed any coherent form of spirituality. The idea that a religious entrepreneur is going to appear among us and guide post-industrial secular society back to faith is a fantasy.

Historians are usually wary of generalizations; they trade in particularity. Jenkins shows an admirable willingness to tell a global story. He leaves a large hole, though, where one might hope to find a theory of what connects religious and demographic change. Does reproduction suffer when religious commitment declines, or is there something about low fertility that leads to religious decline? Or is there an underlying cause for both? Jenkins argues that “it is scarcely necessary to determine an exact sequence of change, as the two factors, fertility and religiosity, work so closely together, and developments occur within a short time span” (pp. 11-12). But what counts as short? The time scale is measured in generations: individuals typically settle into the values and preferences they held in early adulthood; the next steps in matters of family and faith are taken by their children.

This reluctance to move much beyond the correlation presents an interesting contrast with the new book by the prominent political scientist and survey researcher Ronald Inglehart (Religion’s Sudden Decline: What’s Causing it, and What Comes Next?). Inglehart also points to the first and second demographic transitions as key factors, and he is much more specific about the supposed mechanisms and causal connections. His analyses of the World Values Survey are less persuasive, however, than Jenkins’ careful marshalling of evidence of many kinds.

The association between the demographic transition and what I have called the secular transition is fascinating and important. It may be that “A shift to lower fertility encourages declining religiosity, which in turn would discourage religious enthusiasm, and so on, in a kind of feedback loop” (p. 14). It is hard not to suspect, though, that value change rooted in the prosperity, complexity, diversity and freedom of modern society is the cause of both. To that extent Jenkins is rediscovering and reframing the secularization thesis, which he boldly applies to the entire world – something that even Steve Bruce, the leading proponent of the theory, has been loath to do.

Disputes over how to interpret the evidence are almost beside the point, though. Jenkins gives historians and social scientists plenty to ponder, providing both a remarkable panorama of the woods and an assiduous examination of the trees, displaying the fruits of years of research in a book that is completely accessible to a general audience. It deserves to be widely read.

David Voas, University College London

© David Voas, 2021

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Counting Religion in Britain, September 2021

Counting Religion in Britain, No. 72, September 2021 features 15 new sources of British religious statistics. The contents list appears below and a PDF version of the full text can be downloaded from the following link: No 72 September 2021

OPINION POLLS

  • Savanta ComRes/Culham St Gabriel’s Trust poll on religious education
  • Coronavirus chronicles: Savanta ComRes poll on prayer and church attendance
  • Science versus religion: two questions from Special Eurobarometer 516
  • Anti-Semitism and the Labour Party
  • Online safety: public attitudes to anti-Semitic and Holocaust denial posts and comments
  • Scottish views on increased immigration from Muslim-majority countries

FAITH ORGANIZATION STUDIES

  • Coronavirus chronicles: the impact of the pandemic on English Anglican cathedrals
  • Coronavirus chronicles: Quaker statistics for year-ending 31 December 2020
  • Coronavirus chronicles: the Jewish experience of Covid-19
  • National Secular Society’s new tool against faith schools: the local authority scorecard
  • Centre for Muslim Policy Research paper on animal slaughter without pre-stunning

ACADEMIC STUDIES

  • Coronavirus chronicles: final report of British Ritual Innovation under Covid-19 project
  • Coronavirus chronicles: the state of Anglican clergy morale one year into the pandemic
  • Coronavirus chronicles: newspaper coverage of Muslims during the Covid-19 pandemic
  • Five other recent academic publications

Please note: Counting Religion in Britain is © Clive D. Field, 2021

 

Posted in church attendance, Covid-19, Ministry studies, News from religious organisations, Religion and Education, Religion and Politics, Religion in public debate, Religion in the Press, Religion Online, Religious beliefs, Religious prejudice, Survey news | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Counting Religion in Britain, August 2021

Counting Religion in Britain, No. 71, August 2021 features seven new sources of British religious statistics. The contents list appears below and a PDF version of the full text can be downloaded from the following link: No 71 August 2021

FAITH ORGANIZATION STUDIES

  • Coronavirus chronicles: Covid-19 and the Christian Church
  • Coronavirus chronicles: the Jewish experience of Covid-19

OFFICIAL AND QUASI-OFFICIAL STATISTICS

  • Office for National Statistics consultation on 2021 census outputs
  • Religious marriages in England and Wales, 2018
  • Religious hate crimes in Scotland, 2020–21
  • Entries for Religious Studies in June 2021 school examinations in England and Wales

ACADEMIC STUDIES

  • Four recent articles in religion journals

Please note: Counting Religion in Britain is © Clive D. Field, 2021

Posted in church attendance, Covid-19, Measuring religion, News from religious organisations, Official data, Religion and Education, Religion Online, Religious Census, Religious prejudice, Rites of Passage, Survey news | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Counting Religion in Britain, July 2021

Counting Religion in Britain, No. 70, July 2021 features 10 new sources of British religious statistics. The contents list appears below and a PDF version of the full text can be downloaded from the following link: No 70 July 2021

OPINION POLLS

  • Coronavirus chronicles: comfort about resuming attendance at places of worship
  • Perceived tension between different religions: Ipsos multinational survey
  • Perceptions of anti-Semitism and Islamophobia as problems in the UK
  • Reported sightings of, and suspected government secrecy about, UFOs: YouGov poll

FAITH ORGANIZATION STUDIES

  • Coronavirus chronicles: Church Army launches ‘investigating the distanced church’
  • Coronavirus chronicles: Methodist Church Statistics for Mission
  • Coronavirus chronicles: Jewish mortality during the first year of the pandemic

OFFICIAL AND QUASI-OFFICIAL STATISTICS

  • Coronavirus chronicles: marriages in Scotland dramatically down in 2020

ACADEMIC STUDIES

  • Recent articles in academic journals: theme issue on psychological type and religion
  • Recent articles in academic journals: six miscellaneous

Please note: Counting Religion in Britain is © Clive D. Field, 2021

Posted in church attendance, Covid-19, Ministry studies, News from religious organisations, Official data, Religion and Education, Religion and Social Capital, Religious prejudice, Rites of Passage, Survey news | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Counting Religion in Britain, June 2021

Counting Religion in Britain, No. 69, June 2021 features 13 new sources of British religious statistics. The contents list appears below and a PDF version of the full text can be downloaded from the following link:  No 69 June 2021

OPINION POLLS

  • Religion questions in recent polling by Number Cruncher Politics for British Future
  • Coronavirus chronicles: vaccine hesitancy and religious groups – Ipsos MORI polling
  • YouGov poll of public attitudes to lobbying by faith leaders against assisted dying
  • Attitudes towards the recent conflict between Israel and Palestinians
  • Survation survey of political party identification and voting among British Muslims
  • Is it being political for football fans to sing songs about the Pope or ISIS?
  • Alternative beliefs: do aliens exist and have they visited the earth?

FAITH ORGANIZATION STUDIES

  • Coronavirus chronicles: Good Faith Partnership’s vision for Covid-19 recovery

OFFICIAL AND QUASI-OFFICIAL STATISTICS

  • Coronavirus chronicles: vaccine hesitancy and religious groups – ONS data
  • Faith schools and their pupils in England, January 2021
  • Religious profession in the armed forces as at 1 April 2021

ACADEMIC STUDIES

  • Values as the new religion: Linda Woodhead’s Edward Cadbury Lectures, 2021
  • Coronavirus chronicles: University of York’s ‘Churches, Covid-19, and Communities’

Please note: Counting Religion in Britain is © Clive D. Field, 2021

Posted in Covid-19, News from religious organisations, Official data, Religion and Education, Religion and Ethnicity, Religion and Politics, Religion and Social Capital, Religion in public debate, Religious beliefs, Religious prejudice, Survey news | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Counting Religion in Britain, May 2021

Counting Religion in Britain, No. 68, May 2021 features 14 new sources of British religious statistics. The contents list appears below and a PDF version of the full text can be downloaded from the following link:  No 68 May 2021

OPINION POLLS

  • Afterlife beliefs: multinational poll from Maru Public Opinion
  • Religion and funerals: SunLife’s The Cost of Dying 2021 Report
  • First religion-related findings released from Fall 2020 Pew Global Attitudes Survey
  • Religion and conversion therapy: YouGov poll of public attitudes
  • Religion and charitable giving: YouGov Profiles data, 2020–21
  • Perceptions of anti-Semitism and Islamophobia as problems in the UK
  • Coronavirus chronicles: Israel as a potential holiday destination

FAITH ORGANIZATION STUDIES

  • Peter Brierley’s overview of numbers and trends in the UK church scene in 2021
  • Coronavirus chronicles: Church of Scotland’s congregational statistics report for 2020

OFFICIAL AND QUASI-OFFICIAL STATISTICS

  • Coronavirus chronicles: latest ONS data on vaccine hesitancy and religion
  • Coronavirus chronicles: updated ONS figures on deaths involving Covid-19 by religion
  • Scotland’s census, 2022: religion topic report
  • Teacher Roman Catholic approval management information for Scotland

ACADEMIC STUDIES

  • Coronavirus chronicles: three articles in the current edition of Rural Theology

Please note: Counting Religion in Britain is © Clive D. Field, 2021

Posted in Covid-19, News from religious organisations, Official data, Religion and Education, Religion and Ethnicity, Religion and Politics, Religion and Social Capital, Religion in public debate, Religious beliefs, Religious Census, Religious prejudice, Rites of Passage, Survey news | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment